The Return of the S16?

I’ll admit I was a little more than disappointed when Nissan initially denied any rumor to the S-Chassis returning as a smaller, slimmer version of the 370Z to compete with the Toyobaru twins.

I never get tired of the S15

Many Nissan fans didn’t like the news that Nissan though of the Juke as a suitable replacement in the subcompact sports car class.

hmmm..

In 1996 Nissan unveiled the Urge, a six speed rear wheel drive roadster that was a few years to late to the game.

With Chevy and other manufacturers clamoring to replicate the success of the lightweight rear wheel drive Toyabaru twins, it only seems logical for Nissan to bring back something that’s long been a staple of their company.

In the fall of 2012, Nissan design director Shiro Nakamura talked Austrailian based automotive magazine Drive and hinted to the possibility of a lightweight rear wheel drive coupe.

Hinting to the possibility that Nissan may consider downsizing its sports cars, including possibly a sub-compact 370Z model got enthusiasts excited. He also revealed that the next version of the Nissan Z may not have a higher displacement motor than the current one.

“I much prefer smaller sports cars,” Nakamura said. “With 370Z, we still don’t know if the next-generation will have a smaller or larger engine.”

Besides the possibility of a smaller engine, Nakamura said reducing the weight of the next Z car is a priority and all other future Nissan sports cars will be lightweight.

As well as dropping hints to the next Nissan Z, Nakamura also spoke about the possible return of the Silvia, otherwise known in the States as the 240SX. Nakamura was notably coy when pressed for details from Drive Magazine, could this really be in the works at Nissan?

“I cannot say,” Nakamura said, “A light, sport coupe is a nice concept, I like it.” he would continue after reinforcing the fact that he was a huge fan of the lightweight rear wheel drive platform.

With the 350Z, 370Z, and the Skyline GT-R, could Nissan support all the different platforms and vehicles as well as possibly add the new 240SX to rival the FR-S and BRZ under the same performance moniker?

According to Nakamura, yes. “If there is a market, we will do it,” Nakamura said.

Rumors are abound regarding the MR engine and many have projected it’s use as a 1.8L powerplant. Question is will that be enough to hang with the likes of the new FR-S, BRZ and STi flagships that have recently been released?

If there’s any clue to the temperature of the “market” and the willingness of Chevy and other domestic manufacturers to join the lightweight rear wheel drive coupe race, we could see the S16 make a triumphant return.

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Case Studies : Following the progress of Tomei’s Hyundai Genesis Turbo

My first experience with a Hyundai was when I was a teenager, and my father owned a 1984 white 4door Hyundai Excel. This thing was the epitome of the 80’s econo-crapbox, constructed with cheap plastics and budget minded parts that  translated into a reputation of being notoriously unreliable.

I can remember a time when the word Hyundai would make car enthusiasts turn up their noses and spit in disgust at the Korean Automaker that struggled to make a name for themselves in the US.

While my fathers Hyundai Excel ran for over 400,000 miles on the original motor, for the most part this reputation was well deserved.

Fast forward 30 years, and Hyundai has done a marvelous job reinventing themselves, and while the foray into the sport compact market has netted the Korean automaker less than desirable results in previous years, they seem to have hit a homer with the Hyundai Genesis.

While the luxury sedan has been well received by the automotive press, the coupe (shown here) is powered by the G4KC, a 4 cylinder turbocharged aluminum motor named the Theta.

What can I say? I’m a sucker for 4 cylinder turbocharged goodness!

With the revolution in rwd sport compacts such as the Genesis and the FR-S, RWD sport compact enthusiasts have never had it better!

I will be following the progress of one of my favorite tuners, Tomei and their Genesis Coupe Turbo to see just how it stacks up against some of the classic 4 cylinder turbocharged titans that have graced the US shores such as the SR20DET, EJ25, and my all time favorite the 4G63.

Stay tuned and happy boosting!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a SAFC in a MKIV Supra TT

I’ve died and gone to piggyback heaven in the early stages of 2012, as a good friend recently picked up a MINT 1997 Anniversary Edition Toyota Supra Turbo. I have always loved these cars and the insane amount of over-engineering that went into the legendary 2JZGTE.

Since this car is probably one of the ONLY stock Supras left on the face of planet Earth, my friend decides to go slow and just start at BPU for now. Basic Performance Upgrades for the Supra can routinely and reliably push the car into the mid 400 wheel horsepower range.

Here we install an older Apexi Super AFC piggyback fuel controller onto the Supra, just one part of the BPU process.

Things you will need
– S-AFC or AFC NEO – Depending on your preference. My buddy happens to be an ex-employee of Apexi, and he prefers the older AFCII. That’s what we’ll be installing in this writeup.
– 10mm socket
– Wire strippers
– soldering iron and solder
– flux if applicable

First disconnect the negative battery terminal, and open the passenger door to reveal the kickfloor and ECU panel.

Undo the three 10mm nuts and pull back on the ECU cover to reveal the ECU.

Next, take a look at the Supra ECU diagram, you will be splicing into most of the wires, and cutting just one.

Next locate the 40 pin plug, located closest to you if you are looking towards the front of the car. You are splicing the RED wire into pin 31 for switched power to the AFC unit, if you own the AFC NEO it will be the RED wire with WHITE stripe.

Next we locate the primary ECU plug that is part of the plastic shroud, again you want the plug closest to you or E10 for those who have a service manual. You will be splicing the green wire into the RPM signal pin 58

Here is a shot of the green wire spliced into pin 58.

Next we will ground the SAFC, make sure to locate your brown and black wires and FOLLOW the detailed instructions in your AFC manual. You must splice the black and brown wires apart on the ground pin, located on E11 pin 69.

Pin 69 must be spliced and soldered by placing the brown wire (ground 1) closest to the ECU, and the black wire (ground 2 ) an inch downstream of the ECU harness. Here is what you power and ground wires should look like installed.

Next keep the E11 plug in your hand and locate pin 43, which is the throttle position pin. Splice the gray wire into pin 43 for the throttle input to your AFC. Now, locate pin 66 and cut it leaving yourself plenty of room on either end of the wire.

Now take the yellow AFC wire and solder it into the wire you just cut, TOWARDS the ECU. After that take the white AFC wire and solder it into the wire, AWAY from the ECU

I used the Apexi supplied quick connectors on this Supra, as the plans are to move to a VPC or standalone later down the road. Soldering here is optional and not recommended should u have more plans for your 2JZ down the road.

Lastly, you can elect to wire the blue AFC wire to pin 48 on the E11 connector for narrowband 02 readings on the fly.

Now snap the ECU connectors back into the ECU and double check your wires for positive connection. Reconnect your battery cable and turn the ignition to the “on” position.

Once your AFC boots up, you can now make the proper adjustments before starting your Supra.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SETTING, then to TH-POINT and set your LO value to 94, and then your HI value to 95% throttle.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SENSOR TYPE and select HOT-WIRE with input values of 1 in and 1 out.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to CAR SELECT and select cylinder 6 with the throttle position in the upward position.

Now, use the NE-POINT menu in ETC to set your NE = 7000 RPM.

Since we are not installing injectors this time around, we will not be modifying the Supra’s low throttle fuel trims at this time.

Next up, installing the downpipe, exhaust and boost controller in the dash to 400 whp.