SRT-4 Civic? Say it isn’t so……

Civics are funny cars.

Most will garner negative responses from people, the occasional “ricer” or other obligatory insult, usually uttered by those ignorant of Honda’s rich racing tradition or what Honda has done for automotive enthusiasts for the last 2 decades.

But they are also some of the coolest machines on the road ( well, at least for me ) and I for one love Hondas for their cheap price, light weight and an excellent choice of modifications.

So it’s not everyday when I see a motor swap in a Civic that makes me scratch my head. And that’s what makes this Civic so special?

Yes, that’s a SRT-4 engine stuffed into a EG!! I can hear Honda fan boys gasping in shock all across the world!

If you can get over the obvious Honda – Dodge hate, it’s clear to see why this is a cool choice. Cool gimmicks such as oil squirters, oversized diameter valves and seats, exhaust valves made of Inconel and a larger displacement are all great upgrades over the usual GSR or K series swap.

440hp / 424 ft lbs of tq from one unique swap.

Happy boosting!

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Project SRT-4 : Back on the road and tuning with the AFC

Project SRT-4 has been on a long hiatus, and after popping the headgasket late in 2008, we’ve finally gotten back around to getting this monster back on the street. Since it’s been a few weeks since our last update, let’s run through a quick recap.

Staying with the stock bottom end, we’ve chosen to run a Cometic head gasket for the SRT-4 along with ARP head studs to keep the 2 halves together.

Head is assembled, cams and cam caps torqued and assembly lube generously applied. Next, we torque down the head, following the SRT-4 tightening sequence.

Now onto the real challenge, installing and fabricating the downpipe, chargepipe and turbo kit on the back of this motor. What you are looking at is a 50mm Tial wastegate, DNP Turbo manifold and the back of the motor.

Project SRT cracked 350 whp on my Dynojet448x using a slightly upgraded stock turbo and stock fuel. Since then, we’ve stepped up to a 62-1 Garrett T3/T4 turbocharger in hopes of chasing down 440 whp on 91 octane.

Unfortunately, that also means ditching the stock manifold, turbo and downpipe, and if you’ve ever seen the SRT-4 Engine bay, you know how much of a bitch this is going to be.

After quite a bit of cursing and yelling, we’ve mounted and installed the turbo, manifold and wastegate, but our problem is still the dumptube.

Here’s a shot of under the car, looking at the back of the motor between the firewall and subframe. If you see the 2 power steering lines going into the rack there, that is about the only space we have to route a dumptube.

Time to get lucky.

Using a Vibrant V-band flange, we weld a 1.75 inch J pipe and completely hack up the bend to get the radius as tight as humanly possible.

After a lot of cutting and hacking, we’ve got a pipe that allows us to bolt it to the wastegate egress, but the bend is not tight enough to clear the power steering lines or alternator properly. Further, the opening is not large enough for us to cut and reweld, and instead of removing parts again, we’ve opted to heat up the pipe and bend as need be.

Unfortunately, we forget that the dump tube is 304 stainless.

It look a whole lot of heating and bending, but we finally got the screamer pipe to bolt on and clear all the lines properly.

A look at the finished product, note the clearance on the power steering lines as well as the clearance to the charge pipe coming off the turbo.

Now with that out of the way, we go to tune the SRT-4, only to find that the AFC NEO has a blank screen and refuses to turn on. This is a fairly common issue for these piggybacks as people love to yank and pull on the wiring loom, pulling the daughter board out of the AFC PCM.

To fix this issue, simply remove the hex bolts on the back of the AFC NEO and gently pull apart.

After plugging the harnesses back into the daughterboard, we snap the NEO back together and reinstall the hex bolts.

Your NEO may or may not go into DEMO mode, a mode in which the screen flashes and is not responsive to any button inputs. To solve this issue, turn the car off and then turn it back on while holding the UP button on your NEO.

This will force it into a diagnostic mode, where you must select to “reset” the NEO to gain control of it again.

After all the little BS issues are taken care of, we dial in the boost at a very low 10 psi and hit the streets with a datalogger to get some rough tuning out of the way.

Next up?

Dyno time for the SRT-4 as we chase 400hp on 91 octane.

Happy boosting!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a Greddy Emanage in a DC2

Another piggyback, another writeup on how to install a Greddy Emanage into any 97+ OBDII Integra running a P72 ecu.

When we last visited our Project DC2, we had encountered some timing issues under load and more specifically anything over 15 psi of boost as our FPR wasn’t getting the job done.

This article on how to install a Greddy emanage has been moved permanently. Please check it out by clicking here.

RB25 Power

Click here for the rest of the How To Install a Greddy Emanage

Case Studies – Project Supra hits the Dyno!

When we last left our 1997 Anniversary Edition Supra, it was just getting used to calling to it’s new owner and had been modded for the first time in its life.

Because the car is so new, my friend is adamant about going slow and keeping it BPU for a while. He even goes so far as to utter the sentence I have heard about a zillion times from customers over the years.

“No, I’m more than happy with this power level, I don’t need to mod the car any further”

When people usually say this to me, I snort in derision and just sit back as the mod bug proceeds to take a huge bite of their wallet.

My friend has been a employee of Apexi for over 7 years, and even he cannot deny the temptress that is the 2JZ.

Within a few days of installing the old school Super AFC, he went out and purchased an upgraded turbo, manifold, Greddy 4 row intercooler, a full set of Greddy gauges, and 660cc RC injectors.

The turbo installed is a T4 62-1 with a 4 inch inlet .70 a/r compressor, with a stage V 1.01 A/R exhaust side.

For a rough idea of how much of an upgrade this small turbo is, take a look at this side by side comparison of a T4 62-1 and a CT26.

He’s elected to go with a SSAutochrome style Ebay log style manifold coupled with a 44mm Tial wastegate dumping back into a 3inch downpipe and full exhaust with a high flow cat.

With just a few mods and a turbo / manifold swap, we head down to our friends at DSR, check them out here : http://www.dynospotracing.com/

Using the DatScan datalogger, we tap into the Supra’s ECM to get a firm readout on the engine’s vitals. More importantly we determine the tip-in point for boost as we dial in the fuel trims accordingly.

We are aiming for a 12.5 AFR at the transition and a rock solid 11:1 at WOT until redline. The Supra is running 22 psi of boost through a full catback and 3inch Vibrant High Flow Catalytic Converter.

After just an hour, the car put down a SAE corrected power level of 521 with 433 ft lbs of torque.

The Supra put down a very healthy number with an excellent fuel curve, all for just a handful of mods. Next up for the car is a bigger turbo, more boost and Crower cams!

Congratulations Eric!

Case Studies : Preparing the Talon for Dyno Day

Jesse’s Talon has come quite a ways after being cleaned up and gone through. Now all that remains is re-torquing the head studs and heading back to the dyno in our quest for 500whp.

Make sure to look up your head tightening sequence to ensure you follow manufacturer guidelines. The studs we are tightening are part number ARP-207-4201.

Now take your torque wrench and follow the guidelines given to you by ARP, if this is a fresh install make sure to follow the 2 step tightening method outlined on your white card inside your box.

Torquing head

Next, we install a set of Pro Street Cam Gears for the 4g63 to move our overlap to a more desirable range for our 62-1 turbocharger.

Pro Street Motorsports

Next up : Installing our cam gears, adjusting the overlap, and heading to the dyno!!!!

 

Case Studies – Jesse’s RB25 S13 – The Beginning

Jesse’s S13 first came to me as a 700 dollar shell with an auto tranny and a completely shot KA24. Within a week, Jesse had sourced a RB25 and tranny and had 2 wiring harnesses ready to be wired up.

When it came to the mounts, Jesse had sourced a shop that was closing in San Jose off of Bird Avenue. After review, the mounts looked to be a Ruckus Racing knockoff, and the shop had left us with doubt, but they worked like a charm

Ruckus Rep Mounts

Within 3 hours, we had the stock KA out and the RB25 mounted and ready to rock and roll.

After dropping the motor in, next was getting the car to run as it was missing the turbos, exhausts, maf and intake pipes.

Deciding to go the budget route, Jesse had me weld a wastegate opening into his manifold, and we opted to use a Ebay adapter flange to go from Garrett flange to the T3 flange. After test mounting the turbo, a Pro Street AN oil return line was installed.

Running a T3 62-1 with a .84 a/r and Stage V hotside, along with a Pro Street downpipe and Pro Street Stage III Intercooler Kit using a Spearco 2-216 core, Jesse’s RB25 put down 325 SAE corrected wheel horsepower at 14 psi on my Dynojet.

Resonators? inline mufflers? who needs that crap?

My time tuning Jesse’s car was limited as his stock side feed injectors just couldn’t keep up with the turbo. After 6000 rpm, the injector duty cycles began to creep above 85% which was well above the Apexi Power FC warning threshold.

Up next : Installing top feed injectors into the S13.